Browsing Thought Leadership

Smart City Design Forum with Ashley Hand of CityFi

We are living in an era that is exhibiting tremendous growth and change in technology innovation. Here in Kansas City, we witnessed the conversation on “smart cities” shift from a concept to reality. In 2015, the City of Kansas City, Missouri formalized a $15.7 million project, resulting in the nation’s most comprehensive Smart City to date, a smart corridor that follows the 2 mile-long streetcar route.

As Kansas City continues to be recognized as an early adopter of smart city technologies, we at Helix are committed to being on the forefront of how this affects our city and work as designers. Earlier this month we had the pleasure of hearing from national smart cities expert Ashley Z. Hand at our bi-monthly Design Forum, to explore the impact of smart city concepts in design.

An architect by education, Ashley is co-founder of CityFi, an advisory group of global thought leaders in the transportation, technology, government and finance sectors. She recently served as the Transportation Technology Strategist for the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation and was previously appointed by Mayor Sly James where she developed our local Smart City Initiative as the first Chief Innovation Officer of the City of Kansas City, Missouri.

Ashley shared her insights on three key questions.

What is a Smart City?

The British Standards Institute (BSI) defines a smart city as “the effective integration of physical, digital and human systems in the built environment to deliver sustainable, prosperous and inclusive future for its citizens.” This, for example, could include smart street-level sensors like we’ve seen in Kansas City. These sensors are strategically located devices that relay real-time information for use to monitor infrastructure service levels. Sensors can track information such as air quality, light levels, activity and temperature (source).

Dreaming about the future of technology in cities is nothing new. These two magazine covers are 100 years apart, however the themes are strikingly similar. Cities must of course adapt to change, but the pace of technological innovation in recent decades is presenting a new challenge. We’ve seen this exhibited as the public sector addresses new tech-enabled business models in the private sector such, as AirBnb, Zipcar, Uber.

Is Kansas City a Smart City?

Image Credit: Meridian Kiosks.

Kansas City continues to be recognized for making data informed decisions. The City’s policy on open data (all data collected is available online publicly) has increased public trust and transparency. Subsequently, their open data policy encourages a local entrepreneurial spirit. The growing network of data collected by our Smart City infrastructure serves as a living lab for Cisco, Think Big Partners and other private companies. The applications and benefits are limitless.

Kansas City has developed and implemented one of the nation’s most comprehensive and innovative smart city plans. It has been collecting data in the public right-of-way that could be useful to improve city services and our experience downtown. But there is still a lot of opportunity ahead to utilize this powerful infrastructure to the best of its potential as it will be critical to operationalize this data to make a difference.

What is the role of a designer in a Smart City?

Designers have a responsibility to harness technology to make decisions in a people-first way. We as architects have an incredible perspective and advantage when it comes to asking “what’s next?” for smart cities. We already exercise a ‘people first’ philosophy to our work.

“We must define what we want for the future of our cities. Don’t let the technology happen to you.” -Ashley Z. Hand

Image credit Bicycle Dutch.

One example of designing for the human experience is the use of the Dutch Intersection in Chicago. Paris was able to use existing collected street level sensor data to prove that pedestrian usage in urban areas was high enough to make a change towards intersections designed not just for cars, but for pedestrian and bike use. Existing data can be a catalyst for necessary change, and a concrete way to better balance the skeptics.

And finally, we must be proponents for good design. Connected infrastructure can be beautiful.  As designers, we should not only care about design for technology capturing devices and infrastructure (an industry that is heavily led by programmers, civic leaders, technologists and manufacturers) but also be advocates for how quality design can enhance the user experience.


We were energized by Ashley’s contagious passion for bettering our city and the people that inhabit it. For more of her insights, you can follow Ashley on Twitter.


5 Ways to Improve Workplace Health with the WELL Building Standard

With the start of a new year, it’s natural to focus on health and wellness. While many of us set goals for a balanced diet and working out, we often overlook improving a large component of our day – the workplace.

The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) was founded on the belief that improving the quality of a building can help people work, live and perform at their best. Studies, like one from the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO) back up their assertions. It found that companies who earned high marks on its HERO Health and Well-Being Best Practices Scorecard, which was done in collaboration with Mercer©, outperformed the 500 largest U.S. companies on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index over a six-year period.

To improve health in work environments, IWBI released the WELL Building Standard in October of 2014. They cover seven, core concepts of health: air, nourishment, fitness, mind, water, light, comfort and innovation. Alissa Wehmueller, Principal at Helix Architecture + Design, saw how the program could benefit our clients and decided to pursue and ultimately, achieved her WELL AP designation.  

“We’ve been encouraging clients to implement many of these strategies for a while. However, this program goes a step further, providing measurable metrics, as well as a breadth of data, to support these ideas,” said Wehmueller.  

Like LEED, WELL’s tenets can be incorporated into spaces whether or not a company is pursuing full certification. The program covers 105 elements, or features, giving buildings and organizations a number of ways to make their work environment healthier.

“With so many initiatives to choose from, knowing where to start can be daunting. If you’re ready to make some changes, start by talking to your associates first. Find out the biggest concerns in the office, along with which ideas associates are most excited about and work to address those,” said Wehmueller.

WELL accounts for the entire workplace experience, covering everything from air quality to an employee’s physical comfort. Here, Wehmueller shares five strategies that can improve workplace health using the standard as a guide.

  1. Support mental health.

    There are number of ways that a well-designed office can improve an employee’s mental health from encouraging healthy sleep habits to providing connections and access to nature. Flexibility is another important element. Research has shown a connection between job satisfaction, as well as a group’s cohesiveness, to the presence of varied spaces that support different workstyles. The WELL Standard says work environments should offer spaces to work, focus, collaborate and rest. This means providing a combination of quiet zones, collaborative spaces and multi-functional workstations for team members.

  2. Reevaluate lighting.

    Effective lighting design, offering access to daylight for our bodies’ circadian rhythms, workstations positioned to reduce glare and daylight modeling are just a few of the thirteen ways the WELL Standard addresses light. Natural daylight and access to views of nature are critical components of supporting employees’ overall well-being and healthy sleep habits.

  3. Reduce distractions.

    Internal noise can lead to decreased productivity, particularly in open offices where distractions and interruptions are frequent. However, there are a large number of acoustic solutions and design practices companies can use to ensure each employee has a comfortable place to focus. Impact reducing flooring, sound barriers, sound masking and sound reducing surfaces can help companies enhance their teams’ performance and ability to focus.  

  4. Foster healthy nutrition.

    Eating habits are often influenced and reinforced through cues in our environment. Currently, only 8 percent of people consume the recommended four servings of fruit per day, and 6 percent consume the recommended five servings of vegetables per day. Providing access to healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables and communal cooking areas can foster healthier decision making. WELL also suggests the reconfiguration of dining environments to increase the appeal and visibility of nutritious foods. Providing convenient bottle refilling stations with filtered water and signage to encourage drinking water reminds associates to stay hydrated.

  5. Start moving.

    Encourage employees to take the stairs by making stairwells open and accessible. Another method to incentivize movement is to add physical activity spaces or make changes to the building’s exterior, such as designing cyclist and pedestrian-friendly environments. Organizations can also supplement gym memberships and fitness programs to encourage an active lifestyle outside the office.

Organizations with healthier employees can not only increase productivity and retention, but also reduce health insurance costs for individuals, as well as their businesses. With a variety of elements to choose from, there are multiple ways to reap the benefits of the WELL Standard. Discover which features are the best fit for your organization by contacting us at info@helixkc.com to schedule a space evaluation.


15 May, 2017 | Academic, Thought Leadership

Missouri State University Historic Renovation Merges Past and Present

For many, fall means back to school, but for Missouri State University, it also marks the beginning of construction on Hill Hall’s renovation.

At 92 years old, Hill Hall is one of the three original buildings on the campus’s historic quadrangle. Originally completed in 1924, the building carries a tremendous amount of history within its walls. Designed by President Clyde M. Hill, the Education Building is one of the most-widely copied designs in the United States.

From its early days as the Education Building to today, the exterior has stood the test of time. However, like most historic buildings, the interior environment no longer serves the university’s modern needs. Missouri State University knew they wanted a space that was flexible, reflected the building’s history, improved accessibility and created departmental adjacencies. Helix Architecture + Design was hired to assist the university with renovating this important structure.

Hill Hall is used by the College of Education and the Department of Psychology. Spaces for the multiple user groups were not adjacent to one another, but spread throughout the building, which made wayfinding and creating a true home-base for students a challenge. To ensure the renovated layout was easier to navigate, the Helix team worked with all user groups to develop a clear program for the space. They improved wayfinding throughout by increasing transparency, providing places for signage, locating core elements in the same location on each floor and improving departmental adjacencies. The new signage provided opportunities to highlight each group’s identity as well.

One of the biggest challenges that came with renovating the space was improving accessibility. The existing building did not provide a clear path for all building users, which made getting to and from class difficult. Creating an accessible route required connecting the entrances on the first floors with a series of ramps, but this key change will make the first floor area more open, connected, inviting and accessible for all visitors.

Both the School of Education and the Department of Psychology also wanted to make the building more student-centric. The existing building offered very few places for students to gather, study, relax or socialize. The Helix team was able to create a specific space for this, playfully located in an old pool that had been converted into a storage areaand was underutilized for decades. The new plans include a lounge space, computer labs and small study rooms. This space greatly enhances the building by allowing students to gather outside of the classroom to study, collaborate and better utilize technology resources.

Faculty also wanted to make their offices more welcoming and conducive to meeting with students. This meant creating places that were easier to find and more approachable. To ensure the completed space can evolve along with faculty needs, the new offices allow for growth and change, without focusing on hierarchy. Classrooms also provide flexibility for faculty to modify the rooms as pedagogy and technology continually evolves.

Preserving the historical elements of Hill Hall was important to the entire team. The original central circulation stair that connects the floors was maintained, along with the original terrazzo floors in many areas.

With construction underway, Hill Hall will offer new benefits to students and faculty just in time for the 2018 school year. Improved accessibility, the addition of social/study spaces and the reorganized layout deliver a student-centric design, while still honoring the building’s historic past.


31 March, 2016 | Thought Leadership, Workplace

The Power of Workplace

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A ROOM FULL OF CORPORATE RECRUITERS GET TO DESIGN THEIR IDEAL WORK ENVIRONMENT?


Recruiters are on the front lines for corporations, and as many have experienced the workplace environment can either be a hindrance or a powerful tool. Last night, Team-KC: Life+Talent partnered with Alissa Wehmueller, workplace design expert with Helix Architecture + Design to explore the impact the workplace environment has on attracting and retaining talent. Alissa shared research on the benefits of investing in the work environment as well as best practices for how a company can achieve the greatest impact from their space.

AlissaImage courtesy of MetroWireMedia / Autumn Morningsky

WHAT IS THE VALUE OF INVESTING IN YOUR WORKPLACE?
There are a wide range of studies related to employee retention, engagement and attraction that have evaluated the benefits corporations experience when they invest in their workplace environment. A recent Work Design magazine article highlights how making that investment can enhance recruitment, lower attrition rates and increase profitability.

“A 2014 Hassell study indicated that the combination of strong overall culture and facilities actually outweighs salary and benefits when it comes to accepting a job offer. Moreover, a 2015 Chandler MacLeod study found that nearly three quarters of candidates would consider a slightly lower salaried position in a company that their friends have communicated is a great place to work.”

When you factor in the savings of employee retention — it can save a company $250,000 per employee — the financial benefits alone are a substantial payoff.

WE CAN’T ALL BE GOOGLE
As the workplace landscape shifts, there has been some backlash against the open office work environment in the media the last few years, including the widespread – Google got it wrong. Actually, Google got it right – for Google. But that doesn’t mean their environment is right for you. Ping pong tables, slides and yurts are not the key to a successful environment – understanding how your associates work and what they value is.

Trozzolo Communications

SO WHERE DO YOU START?
Creating the ideal space for your organization is a balance of qualitative and quantitative data. Bringing on a workplace design expert early to guide this info-gathering phase ensures that you are starting off on the right foundation of data. This information will guide the layout, furniture and amenities to make sure your company is investing in the right choices and gaining the greatest value for your employees and the company.

WHAT ARE THE ELEMENTS OF A PROGRESSIVE WORKPLACE?
While the best solution will vary from company to company, there are three key factors we find are consistently driving the success of progressive work environment:

  1. Choice
  2. Wellness
  3. Telling your story

Trends will come and go, but creating a flexible environment that responds to the unique needs of your people and showcases your culture will pay dividends in retaining and attracting talent to your organization.

AMU

CHOICE: HOW DO YOU ACCOMMODATE DIFFERENT WORKSTYLES?
One size does not fit all. In fact, one size doesn’t fit
most. For the last 20 years the development of the desktop computer tethered us to our desks, but today’s technology allows us to work anywhere. This flexibility creates a tremendous opportunity to give employees the spaces and tools they need to support a variety of workstyles.

Various workstyles don’t just accommodate different individuals, but also the different tasks one individual might do throughout their day.

Day in the Life

And it’s not just about millennials.

“In 2015, the U.S. workforce was composed of 5 generations:

2% Traditionalist
29% Baby Boomers
34% GenX
34% Millennials
1% Post Millennials”

– Pew Research Center

Creating an environment that supports mentoring, collaboration and knowledge sharing across all of the generations in the workforce elevates the entire organization.

Workplace Wellness

WELLNESS: CAN YOU LEAVE YOUR OFFICE HEALTHIER THAN WHEN YOU ARRIVED?
Is it possible to create a space that reduces stress and helps promote physical well-being?
Employers have increasingly recognized the benefits of investing in initiatives that help improve the health of their associates. The loss of productivity and revenue that companies experience due illness can have a tremendous impact on a company’s bottom line.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation reports that poor employee health accounts for some 45 million avoidable sick days each year and lost annual revenue of between $1,900 and $2,250 per employee.

This is particularly relevant to the design of work space because of the amount of time we spend at our offices each day and the impact that our environment has on our physical, mental and emotional well-being.

Some of the ways you can positively impact your associates include:

  • Develop a space layout that encourages physical activity
  • Select ergonomic furniture to promote good posture
  • Provide a connection to the outdoors
  • Integrate spaces that offer refuge from distractions
  • Provide amenities that help foster relationships

These strategies contribute to health, engagement, happiness and overall job satisfaction.

Andrews McMeel Universal Lobby

TELLING YOUR STORY: DOES YOUR SPACE ALIGN WITH YOUR BRAND?
If you took your logo off the wall would visitors know who you are? What does your physical environment communicate about your culture?

“Out of 3,000 workers surveyed, only 41% say they know what their company stands for and how it differs from their competitors.”

Gallup’s State of the American Workplace

Using your space to communicate your mission, vision, values and company culture is a powerful tool for employees, clients and potential candidates. It clearly communicates that your company is “walking the walk” and investing in their culture.

KCADC TeamKC Helix Event

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE YOUR IDEAL ENVIRONMENT?
We wrapped up the evening with an interactive exercise that allowed teams of recruiters create their own company and design their ideal workplace environment for potential new hires. There were some fun elements (who wouldn’t want to work for a “Technology Party Planner”!) alongside some really well thought out solutions.

Does your sales team love to golf? Incorporating a putting green into the outdoor space can provide a break in the workday and help them keep their short game on point.
Are children your clients? Create a fun, kid-sized entryway that makes your space memorable.
How can you make portions of your space feel like home? Many of us feel like we get our best “focus-work” done at our own homes so creating a quiet, comfortable space that is free of distractions can offer the same relief during the work day.

Thanks to everyone for your thoughtful questions, big ideas and insights into the solutions you’ve implemented in your own workspaces!

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
The needs of a modern workplace are constantly evolving alongside the people who work there. We would love to keep the dialog going on what is or isn’t working in your own work environment, the feedback you’re hearing from recruits or any great resources on creating an exceptional workplace for your people.

To learn more about the power of workplace, connect with Alissa on LinkedIn, send her an email or tweet us at @helixKC and @AlissaMay. To learn more about TeamKC: Life+Talent, contact Jessica Nelson.

For some additional reading check our MetroWireMedia‘s article, “Three ways to give your workplace a competitive edge” and Thinking Bigger‘s article, “A better workplace can help you attract the best workers.”


18 February, 2016 | Academic, Helix People, Thought Leadership

Helix + KCU at SCUP

Helix Architecture + Design and Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCU) will be presenting the transformational renovation of Weaver Auditorium into the university’s new Academic Center at the SCUP 2016 North Central Symposium on April 27th.

HelixKCUMB_6625_LR

Program: RePurpose / ReEngergize – Creating a New Academic Center at KCU

Every higher education institution is dealing with the challenges of having existing buildings that are not designed to accommodate the way that millennials (and Gen Z following them) want to learn and connect with their peers. Because of this, many of these buildings are substantially underutilized.

HelixKCUMB-2_054_LR

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The Academic Center at KCU took an existing building with a large 1,500-seat auditorium and transformed it into a state-of-the-art learning facility and hub for student activity. The design team developed the innovative concept of stacking two lecture halls within the footprint of the existing auditorium.

The lobby and back-of-house auditorium spaces were converted into flexible student break-out and study rooms. This resourceful solution saved nearly a third of what it might otherwise cost to build a new facility and achieved LEED Silver Certification due in part to repurposing of 90% of the materials from the site’s previous building, Weaver Auditorium.

HelixKCUMB_6685_LR

The project was one of multiple identified in the University’s master plan, which was initiated in 2012. The design principles expressed in this master plan are based on a qualitative approach that synthesizes interviews, the aspirations and the goals of KCU with a critical assessment of their current space planning needs.

SPEAKERS:

Helix principal Reeves Wiedeman and project architect Miranda Groth will be co-presenting alongside KCU CFO/CEO Joe Massman and Director of Capital Projects, Tim Saxe on the success.

Reeves Wideman + Miranda Groth

Reeves W. Wiedeman, FAIA
Founding Principal
Helix Architecture + Design

As a founding principal of Helix, Reeves Wiedeman has been a driving force behind the firm’s success across a diverse, award-winning portfolio of work that spans academic, civic, cultural, workplace, hospitality and residential markets. As a market leader for Helix’s higher education clients, Reeves has led all of the firm’s projects for KCU as well as other academic institutions throughout the region. Reeves is an alumnus of the University of Kansas with a Bachelor of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design. His commitment to design excellence and advancement of the profession is evident in his continued involvement with the American Institute of Architects and his selection for Fellowship Status.

Miranda Groth, AIA, LEED AP
Project Manager
Helix Architecture + Design

During her career at Helix, Miranda has managed nearly 150,000 square feet of projects for Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, including the complex adaptive reuse of Weaver Auditorium into the new KCU Academic Center. The project recently received an AIA Central State Design Excellence Award for its ingenuity in repurposing an underutilized structure into an educational hub on the KCU campus. Her methodical project management approach has consistently resulted in her projects being completed under budget and within schedule. Miranda has a Master of Architecture from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies from Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

Joe Massman and Tim Saxe

Joe Massman, MBA
Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer
Kansas City University of Medicine & Biosciences

Joe Massman is chief financial officer (CFO) and chief operating officer at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, where he is responsible for most of its non-academic functions including finance, human resources, compliance, information technology, facilities and campus operations. Prior to joining the field of higher education, Joe was the founder and CEO of the ETF Store, a retail investment advisory firm. Previously, he served as CFO at Freightquote.com and held other senior financial positions with Express.com in Los Angeles, Viacom, Inc., in New York, and KPMG LLP in Kansas City. Joe earned a bachelor of business administration from the University of Notre Dame and a master of business administration from New York University.

Tim Saxe, PE
Director of Capital Projects
Kansas City University of Medicine & Biosciences

Tim provides leadership for the planning, design, construction, and financial performance of capital improvement projects for the University.  Prior to his role at KCU, Tim enjoyed a diverse 15-year career in both design, as an architect and structural engineer at HNTB, and then in construction management, as Project Manager and Knowledge Manager at JE Dunn Construction.  A majority of Tim’s experience is on large scale projects on University campuses.  Tim graduated from the Missouri University of Science & Technology with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering and completed graduate studies in Architectural Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University.

JOIN US!

We’d love to see you at the SCUP 2016 North Central Symposium in Omaha, NE. The conference takes place on April 27th, so register soon! 


5 January, 2016 | Helix People, Thought Leadership

2015 Year in Review

It’s been a great year to be a Kansas Citian. We are incredibly proud of the milestones that our city, our clients, our projects and our staff have accomplished over the last year. Here’s a peek at some of the highlights….
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We can’t wait to see what 2016 has is store!

 


14 July, 2015 | Thought Leadership

Noteworthy at Neocon | Andie’s Top Five

For Helix’s interior designers, summer typically includes a quick trip to Chicago for the industry’s largest convention, Neocon. Held at the Merchandise Mart, the event is attended by 50,000 architecture and design professionals from around the world. Many of the large manufacturers we work with regularly have large showrooms, reinventing themselves each year for Neocon to show off their latest products. Each year we leave inspired by the latest products and trends. Here are a few favorite takeaways from this year….

1. Patricia Urquiola
Hands-down the most memorable part of Neocon 2015 (other than the torrential rain) was attending the keynote lecture of international star designer and architect, Patricia Urquiola. She is a passionate, charismatic, innovative force of nature. Her work is experiential; the objects and spaces she creates are sensitive to the emotional and mental needs of humans while being beautiful, playful, and immersive. She is prolific, designing dozens of new pieces with her various collaborators this year alone. And she deals great advice: “Only work with people you like” and “Get out of your comfort zone”, to name a few. Above all else, she is an exemplary role model for young women, working moms in particular. She has found a way to balance a brilliant career with a strong home life by building her design studio and residence in the same space. See photos HERE. Want more eye candy? Take a look at her book, Time to Make a Book, or the Haworth showroom she designed. I’m in love!

2. Wellness
Wellness is center-stage in the design world now. Similar to the growing prominence of sustainability over the past decade, designers, researchers, and health advocates alike are beginning to realize that the well-being of individuals, communities, businesses, and the environment are all inextricably linked. There are now design guidelines and data galore to support the value of investing in wellness. I attended a fire-in-the-seat-of-your-pants sort of presentation called Ethonomics: Design for Health & Well-being, that took a look at how our built environment (and design decisions) can affect cities and communities at the macro level, workplace culture and business vitality and the building level, down to the mental, emotional, and physical health of the individual at the micro level. Not only should our spaces be beautiful and functional, they should be restorative and supportive too! Check out these great resources for more information:

Teknion – The Rise of Ethonomics
The Well Building Standard
New York City Active Design Guidelines – promoting physical activity and health in design
The 1% – Strengthening Nonprofits through design

3.  Blurring lines between home & work
One of our favorite retail home furnishing brands, West Elm Workspace has launched a commercial line of office furniture in collaboration with Inscape.  It’s hard to say what sort of market impact this will have, but as the trend of blending workplace and home continues, this emerging development makes a lot of sense. The new line includes four collections: Mid-Century, Modern, Industrial, and Contemporary. The Contemporary collection is most similar to what most other office furniture companies offer; the Mid-Century and Modern collections offer the warmth of rich wood tones with stream-lined design; and the Industrial is the most original, taking the charm of an industrial 100-year old warehouse and translating it into plain sawn oak with steel frame.

4. Vitra’s Flexible workplace
Three times a day Vitra staff transformed the showroom in choreographed rhythm, literally, as they dance partied the furniture into various configurations to support education, work, and hospitality settings. On top of the energetic blast of beats pulsing through the space, they also had funky fresh usable furniture, a groovy analog adjustable height plywood workstation, and enough real live greens around every bend, making this fairly basic, windowless showroom electric with good vibes. Always an inspiration! See the beautiful showroom HERE.

5. Sophisticated palettes with a human touch
The most stunning showrooms (in my opinion of course) were simple, stately, and dramatic in their elegance. Davis and Coalesse embodied the restorative, calming traits of designing for wellness with warm wood, clean stone, nubby neutrals, and the dramatic impact of black and white with minimal color accents. In the past, it’s been white showrooms with colors that punch you in the face every time you turn a corner. This year, the design spoke for itself, was gentle and thoughtful, and created space in your brain for things other than stimulation overload.

 

Open PhotoChicago (pre-torrential rain)  |  home of Neocon Chicago (pre-torrential rain) | home of Neocon
Patricia Urquiola, Neocon 2015 Keynote Speaker Patricia Urquiola, Neocon 2015 Keynote Speaker
Open PhotoQuote from Quote from "Ethonomics: Design for Health & Well-being" presentation
West Elm Workspace - Industrial Collection West Elm Workspace - Industrial Collection
Vitra's showroom transformation performance crew Vitra's showroom transformation performance crew
Open PhotoDetail shot of the Detail shot of the "Tix" bench at the Davis showroom

Cocktails & Conversation

This Wednesday, UMKC Architecture Urban Planning + Design and Helix will be co-hosting the monthly AIA Cocktails & Conversation from 5:30-7:30 at UMKC – Katz Hall. Stephen Hardy, Chief Community Builder, with MindMixer will be speaking as the community celebrates the dedication of the new Kivett and Myers Lobby at Katz Hall.

Hope to see you there!

Click photo for more info on aiakc.org Click photo for more info on aiakc.org

18 February, 2013 | Awards, Design, Helix People, Thought Leadership

Jay Tomlinson Receives Fellowship from AIA

Almost every action Jay Tomlinson has taken over his 30-year career has been oriented around creating a vibrant urban core—whether renovating historic structures or adding new buildings to the landscape.

Since he watched construction workers slip the keystone into the Saint Louis Arch as a young child, Jay has sustained the conviction that well-designed structures lead to more vibrant people and places.

A founding principal of Helix Architecture + Design, Jay built his practice around the question: Is it good for the city? He has engaged in all forms of community building—physical, economic, and cultural to make his city a better place.

Toward this goal, Jay found innovative ways to make preservation work financially viable and environmentally sustainable. He assumed leadership positions in city government to make sure it supports and rewards positive development. And he created and/or led organizations—the Urban Society of Kansas City, the Charlotte Street Foundation, and the Nelson-Atkins Museum Friends of Art—to enrich the fabric of urban life.

Open PhotoAn architectural alchemist, Jay Tomlinson—through his practice, civic service, and arts outreach—brought together architects, artists, entrepreneurs, and government in an explosion of vitality, propelling the largest urban renewal effort in Kansas City history. An architectural alchemist, Jay Tomlinson—through his practice, civic service, and arts outreach—brought together architects, artists, entrepreneurs, and government in an explosion of vitality, propelling the largest urban renewal effort in Kansas City history.
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