24 May, 2017 | Renovation, Workplace

KC Tech Firm Supports Rapid Growth with Flexible Work Environment

Valorem has been surpassing expectations with their rapid growth since they opened their doors in 2009. They recently completed their third headquarters expansion. A Microsoft partner, they have expanded beyond their Kansas City headquarters with offices in St. Louis, Missouri; Seattle, Washington; Kochi, India; and Herrliberg, Switzerland. With their remarkable rise, recruiting and retaining top talent is critical for this cutting-edge company.

When Helix principals Evan Fox and Alissa Wehmueller began working with Valorem, their goals were to provide room for growth and create a space that would attract top talent. They chose their building in the heart of the Crossroads, because it would help them achieve both. Our team has assisted Valorem as their headquarters has expanded three times, and the number of employees has more than tripled – all within their existing location.

Working with a rapidly growing technology company presents some unique challenges and opportunities, but like every workplace client, success is driven by thoroughly understanding and creating a space that responds to the culture, technical requirements and workstyles of the talent they want to attract.

Flexibility was a key priority from the beginning for this young company. Their workspace features an open, free-address office environment, along with a limited number of private offices. Free addressing is attractive to tech talent, but also allows the company to save on real estate expenses by housing more people in their space. By choosing a free address approach, Valorem offers employees the freedom to work wherever they would like within the space without spending money on workstations that are vacant much of the day. This provides the adaptability they need for continued growth, while getting the greatest value out of every square foot.

Throughout the building, there are a variety of spaces for collaboration, socializing and focused, quiet work that team members can choose from throughout the day. Lockers in the back allow employees to stow their coats and bags easily.  And employees are able to personalize the space. At Valorem, we added a wall for staff to write-on.

Another key component was helping them communicate and celebrate their brand while connecting to creative culture of the Crossroads Arts District. We used the Valorem logo as a jumping off place, incorporating green and blue throughout the space. One visual representation of this is a large, focal felt well, which was made by local fabricator, Hinge Woodworks. Building upon their location in the heart of Kansas City’s arts community, Valorem partnered with  local artist Phil Shafer (known as Sike Style) to paint a mural in each of their renovations. This has become a recognizable component of their workspace and were such a hit that Valorem hired Sike to do a mural in their Seattle office.

While these solutions are eye-catching and aligned with their company culture, they are also cost-effective. The felt wall pulls triple duty, offering visual interest, providing an acoustic treatment and acting as a partial room divider for workstations.

Throughout our work with Valorem, there were considerations specific to their industry and nature of their business. For example, they needed space for huge screens at workstations, and their conference rooms required substantially more technology than most. To provide a desirable work environment for developers and non-technical staff, some spaces are dark to support heavy computer work, while others have lots of bright, natural light.

When it comes to supporting a company’s growth, organizations should consider flexibility and ways incorporate their culture into their space. Valorem is evidence that a one-size fits all approach isn’t effective.

Photography by Michael Robinson.


5 Ways Universities Can Start Preparing for the Future Now

SCUP_Header

In April, Miranda Groth attended the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) 2017 North Central Symposium. The one-day program featured information on creating successful, long-range plans that go beyond the traditional silos. The event’s speakers covered a wide-range of topics, but one theme emerged – preparation is key. Below, we’re sharing five ways universities and colleges can stay ahead of the curve.

1: An emergency plan should cover more than the expected. However, creating one is no simple feat. Consider how you’ll respond in a crisis if your entire community is affected. For example, will your facility become a triage or medical emergency location? Can generators power your facilities if substations are down? If student housing is impacted, what will you do? Ask the hard questions and put solid protocols in place.

2: Taking action on emissions can start sooner than you think. Facilities are seeing a reduction in maintenance costs by using environmental data differently. Instead of reviewing it after the fact, they are anticipating issues and fixing them before they take place. Start by assessing the accuracy of the data. Compare it to peer institutions. Then, set a new, 2020 goal and begin working towards it.

3: Colleges and universities are preparing students for jobs that don’t yet exist and technologies that have yet to be created. There is a shift towards asynchronous learning with digital tools. There is also a move from hardware to software. Providing project based learning opportunities is the focus. New trends, like gamification, information ubiquity, disintermediation, tangible computing and virtualized classrooms are all examples of how colleges and university are placing a greater emphasis on tech.

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4: The road to funding projects is long and changing. Start now. Cuts in state funding for higher education have caused institutions to start looking at other methods for funding their capital projects. Two, Helix clients, Jim Modig of the University of Kansas and Bob Simmons of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, shared their journey in securing funds on a SCUP panel. Many entities are moving to new funding models, as state dollars become harder to obtain. While donors are still an option, P3 arrangements with private developers are becoming more commonplace.

5: Classroom design is taking its cue from the office. Students need spaces to apply the knowledge they’re learning. Rooms are beginning to model the workforce with more flexibility and areas for teamwork. Because the market continues to evolve, beta testing for faculty to play with a room and see what needs improvement is a key step in both renovations and ongoing evaluation of the spaces available.


9 May, 2017 | Helix People, Leadership, Press

Helix Adds New Talent to the Executive Team

Several years ago, the Helix executive team met to discuss what was next for the firm. They discussed a wide range of options, floating new ideas by one another. Then, big things started to happen.

The first step was announced in August of last year. We merged with the talented designers and architects at Blackbird Design Studio. We knew we were on the right track when we were named AIA Kansas City’s Firm of the Year in December. Now, we’re continuing that growth by adding a respected, local architect as a new partner.

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We’re pleased to announce Doug Stockman, a former founding principal of El Dorado, Inc., will be joining Helix. Doug brings over 23 years of design experience to the firm. Over the course of his career, he’s accumulated an expansive portfolio with work not only in Kansas City, but also throughout the Midwest.

I wanted to be part of a group comprised of thought provoking leaders and designers focused on elevating the human experience through architecture. I have known the leaders of Helix for many years and have the greatest respect for their work within the community. The decision to join Helix was easy,” said Doug Stockman, Principal, Helix.

His background and extensive portfolio complement ours. Doug has been recognized nationally by the American Institute of Architects for his design of the Girls Scouts’ Camp Prairie Schooner Trail Center. In the last decade, his work has primarily focused on mixed-use projects within the urban context. Most of which are multi-family apartments with retail and workplace as a component of the overall project. Ongoing projects nearing completion include new fabrication labs at Kansas State University’s College of Architecture, Planning and Design, as well as a new modular apartment building at 3435 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

Active in the community, Doug has served on a variety of boards and committees: the Kansas City Free Health Clinic, Christmas in October, the MS Society, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the Girl Scouts of Northeast Kansas & Northwest Missouri. Since 1999, he has also served in numerous capacities for the Kansas City Downtown Council (DTC). He currently sits on the DTC’s Executive Committee and Board of Directors as Chairman and the Dean’s Advisory Council at Kansas State University’s College of Architecture, Planning & Design. He is also a board member of Planet Play.


26 April, 2017 | Awards, Design, Recognition

Four Helix Projects Take Home Honors at Mid America Design Awards

Four, very different projects were recognized at the Mid America Design Awards ceremony last Friday. This biennial event honors interior design work within the Kansas City and Wichita areas based on innovation, functionality and implementation of overall design intent and brand.

MADA Celebration

Although the projects couldn’t be more diverse – a brewery, non-profit, workplace and university library, they share several similarities. To begin, all four feature the adaptive reuse of a historic building, blending original elements with each new owner’s aesthetic. But perhaps more importantly, all four were designed with the end-user in mind. Whether welcoming more guests or offering new services, the completed projects are helping each client better serve their community.


Boulevard

Boulevard Brewing Company

TOURS & RECREATION CENTER: GOLD, HOSPITALITY

Boulevard Brewing Company had outgrown their original tasting room, causing them to frequently turn away guests. To accommodate the increasing crowds, they purchased a historic, 1920’s, brick building adjacent to the brewery with the goal of transforming it into an expanded destination. The completed space provides an immersive learning experience, including playful exhibits that share the history of beer making and the origins of Boulevard. Their renovated building is full of handcrafted, artisanal touches – just like Boulevard’s beer. Since opening, they’ve been able to double the number of tours and visitors they can accommodate every day, and the beer hall has become a hub for community events, like yoga classes, charity events and presentations from brewers.


Creamery

The Creamery Building (3D Development)

GOLD, CORPORATE MEDIUM

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Creamery Building had been vacant for years despite its prime location in Kansas City’s Crossroads Arts District. It was renovated to serve the needs of smaller, office tenants and entrepreneurs, who weren’t represented in the marketplace. The design team leveraged the constraints and character of the historic structure to create a flexible series of suites with corresponding amenities that would attract small, yet discerning tenants. The interior finishes in the shared spaces draw upon the existing architecture and industrial history of the building. The raw palette is carried into the suites, allowing tenants to move in without requiring a large investment. The resulting design provides an elevated brand identity beyond average small office suites.


Synergy

Synergy Services

JENNIFER & JAMIE CHILDREN’S CENTER: SILVER, CORPORATE SMALL

Synergy Services was forced to turn away 300 children from their SafeHaven women’s shelter last year due to lack of space. Through a generous donation, the organization received a 2,500-square-feet, nearly 100-year-old farmhouse on a wooded, six-acre site. The home itself was not large enough to address their full programming needs, so we created a plan to renovate the house and build an addition that was safe and welcoming for children of all ages. Drawing inspiration from the site, the design team created a concept reminiscent of a camp or cabin. The finished space feels warm and welcoming with wood finishes and many connections to the surrounding acreage, unlike traditional temporary foster shelters. With the new center, Synergy has been able to serve twice the number of children they did in the past. 


Norrington

Park University

NORRINGTON CENTER: SILVER, HIGHER EDUCATION/RESEARCH

Built in 1908, Norrington Hall originally served as the campus library until those services were relocated in the 1980’s. At that time the interior was converted into a patchwork of office and classroom spaces. In 2015, Park University initiated a renovation to return it to its original roots as a state-of-the-art library and academic commons. The design concept celebrates the historic aspects of the building, while inserting fresh uses and a modern feel to the spaces. The primary design drivers pivot on the notion that the new Norrington Center is not a 20th century library stacked with books and dust, but a 21st century student center filled with learning activities of all types, from individual study, one-on-one tutoring, group work and technologically advanced classroom learning. As Park University had hoped, the Norrington Center has quickly become an asset to students and faculty, providing a welcoming space for gathering, learning, and celebrating with Pirate pride.

Congratulations to our interior design team and our clients who allowed us the pleasure of creating these spaces for your organizations. Successful projects are only achieved through strong relationships across all team members and these awards belong to all of you.

Photos of Boulevard, The Creamery and Norrington Center by Michael Robinson. Photos of the Children’s Center provided by JE Dunn.


Elevating Arts Education for Kansas City Kids

For those of us that grew up with the arts integrated into our upbringing, it’s hard to imagine a childhood without them. But as public funding for arts programs and education continues to diminish, missing out on this invaluable experience is becoming a reality for many children. Helix has a long history of supporting the arts, holding tightly to our belief that arts education produces a valuable social and economic impact within the local community.

KCYA-sm-4355Over the past year, Helix has had the opportunity to work with two such organizations whose work is dedicated to ensuring the arts are accessible to all. They are the Kansas City Young Audiences (KCYA), the largest provider of arts programs in the Kansas City area and Academy for Integrated Arts (AFIA), an arts-centered K-6 charter school. Both chose sites where existing facilities were adapted, allowing them to reach even more kids.

Kansas City Young Audiences

KCYA began by purchasing their first permanent home in Midtown. The building, originally constructed in 1997, was the site of a large box retailer and is located along the Main Street redevelopment. The design team worked with them to develop a concept featuring a variety of flexible spaces to grow with the organization. KCYA hosts various visual and performing arts activities, as well as classes for children. Constructed by McCownGordon Construction, key spaces include two dance studios, a stage and event space, classrooms for music and the fine arts, an art gallery, administration offices with a boardroom and a marketable tenant space.

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AFIA found a new home in an unexpected location – the former King Louie East bowling alley. Vacant for 10 years, the building had substantially deteriorated, and AFIA was sure they would have to demolish it. However, our team was able to develop a plan to renovate the existing building, greatly reducing costs. We worked closely with teachers, administrators and the school’s board of directors to create a space that integrates the arts and technology into curriculum and everyday activities. Their new building is part of the Troost redevelopment, located at 79th & Troost Avenue.

AFIA Classroom

The project better equips AFIA to meet the needs of their students. The new space has allowed enrollment to grow from 120 to 170, and a second phase addition is already underway with the goal of expanding to 350 students. Helix and JE Dunn met the school’s a fast-track schedule, so they could be moved in at the beginning of the 2016 school year.

AFIA Classroom

According to Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning, researchers found “sustained learning” in music and theater correlates to greater success in math and reading. Additionally, students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds had the greatest benefit. In fact, KCYA shared those who participated in the arts were four times more likely to participate in a math and science fair. Despite the strong connection, a 2011 survey by Common Core and FarkasDuffett Research Group reported 66 percent of teachers surveyed said curriculum is moving away from art, music, foreign language and social studies.

Organizations like AFIA and KCYA are working to shift this trend by bringing arts education to Kansas City. Sparking creativity and innovation, non-profits like these are able to thrive through the support of volunteer boards and donors. Learn how you can support KCYA here or get involved with AFIA by donating supplies or volunteering.  

Photos of KCYA by Bob Greenspan. Photos of AFIA provided by JE Dunn.


13 April, 2017 | Academic, Awards, Historic Renovation

Norrington Center at Park University wins Historic Kansas City Preservation Award

Since its founding in 1974, Historic Kansas City (HKC) has been the only greater Kansas City nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of the area’s heritage, neighborhoods and historic built environment. Two weeks ago at their annual Preservation Awards ceremony, HKC celebrated the people – developers, building owners, architects and preservationists – that have demonstrated exceptional leadership in historic preservation across our city.

We are honored that our work on the renovation of Park University’s Norrington Center was among those honored for its preservation and reinvestment in the last remaining Carnegie Library on a college campus in the State of Missouri. The Norrington Center received an Excellence Award in the Contemporary Design in a Historic Context category, which is given to a project that displays innovative contemporary design in a historic context.

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The Carnegie Corporation of New York built 35 public and academic libraries in the state of Missouri between 1899 and 1917. Only one of the academic libraries is still remaining today and that is Norrington Hall on Park University’s campus. Built in 1908, Norrington Hall originally served as the campus library until those services were relocated in the 1980’s. At that time the interior was converted into office and classroom spaces. In 2015, Park University initiated a renovation to return the building to its original roots as a 21st century state-of-the-art library and academic commons.

Norrington Before & After

The majority of the historic character on the interior of the building had been removed during previous renovations but the Helix design team preserved those most defining of the building, including the grand open entry stairwell that connects the first and second floor, the stained glass window in the stairwell landing, ornamental guardrails, wood handrails, stone wall cladding and terrazzo floor finishes in the entry hall. The interior environment was transformed into modern academic and study spaces that will serve the university and make the building viable for years to come.

Norrington Beforehelix_norrigntonhall_1552_lr

The three-story steel and glass floor library stack spaces were inaccessible and unusable for today’s modern academic library. It was removed and the second floor was expanded to create a gallery space with access to restrooms while the first floor was converted into a coffee shop and study space. The design solution increased the functionality of the space while preserving the original windows that spanned the first two floors.

HyperFocal: 0

In order to provide ADA accessibility without altering the historic front entry facade of the building, a new ADA accessible entry vestibule was designed on the rear of the building along with an open patio to create a welcoming secondary entry point along a primarily pedestrian circulation route between the historic Norrington Center and the campus’s historic and iconic administration building, Mackay Hall.

Park University’s investment ensures people will continue to experience the beauty and craftsmanship of this historic structure for years to come.

For those of you that love old buildings as much as we do, Historic Kansas City hosts events throughout the year. You can check them out, along with a full list of award winners on their website.


23 March, 2017 | Awards, Recognition

Four Helix Clients Honored at Kansas City Business Journal’s Capstone Awards

Across Helix’s diverse portfolio of work there is a common thread – creating spaces that have a positive impact on our community. Four projects that exemplify this approach will be recognized this evening at the Kansas City Business Journal’s Capstone Awards ceremony.

The Capstone Awards celebrate projects that have demonstrated excellence in commercial real estate development over the past year. Whether it is an transforming a historic structure for a new life, providing a welcoming space that serves children or creating one of the city’s most celebrated hospitality venues, our clients continually receive accolades for investing in buildings that make our community a better place to work, learn and play.

We are honored to work alongside each of these organizations to bring their vision to life.


Boulevard Tours & Recreation Center

BOULEVARD BREWING CO.

Tours & Recreation Center – Adaptive Reuse Category

Boulevard Brewing Co. hosted approximately 60,000 tour guests in 2015. However, the limited size of their existing space meant they were turning away thousands of additional visitors. In response, Boulevard acquired the four-story, 87-year-old Skelly Oil building located immediately adjacent to the brewing campus and transformed it into their new Tours & Recreation Center. The first floor features an “Experience” area with exhibits about beer and Boulevard, an expanded retail shop and a larger tasting room. The 10,000-square-foot second floor is devoted to a Beer Hall and features a new 1,250-square-foot deck with outdoor seating and downtown Kansas City views.

 

Kansas City University Administration Building

KANSAS CITY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE & BIOSCIENCES

Administration Building Renovation – Adaptive Reuse Category

Originally home to the first Children’s Mercy Hospital, this 100-year-old building was acquired by KCU in the 1970s. Today, the newly renovated building functions as both the Administration Building and Welcome Center. A new open floorplan provides increased accessibility and amenities, including a Welcome Center, coffee bar and shared social/study spaces for the building’s 1,000+ users. The project achieved LEED Gold certification. This preservation and modernization of the building reflects KCU’s past, and celebrates a future of continued collaboration, research and service to the communities it serves.

 

Synergy Services Children's Center

SYNERGY SERVICES

Jennifer and Jamie Children’s Center – Community Impact Category

The new Jennifer and Jamie Children’s Center expands Synergy Services’ ability to provide shelter and services for children who’ve been abused, neglected or have other serious family problems. In addition to renovating the existing 2,500 sq. ft. home located on the property, Synergy invested in 6,500 sq. ft. of new construction on the site. The Center, which serves children from infancy to age 12, allows Synergy to double the number of children they are able serve. The project is designed to be a welcoming hopeful space, avoiding the institutional feel that most temporary foster facilities have.

 

Corrigan

3D DEVELOPMENT / COPAKEN BROOKS

Corrigan Station – Mixed-Use Category

Located prominently along the city’s new streetcar line, the 100-year-old Thomas Corrigan Building was renovated to create 9-stories of office space and 1-story of ground-level retail in the heart of the Crossroads Arts District. Helix worked closely with co-developers Copaken Brooks and 3D Development to develop a design that preserves the historic character of the building in accordance with National Park Service preservation guidelines. The building, which was largely unoccupied prior to renovation, has already attracted new corporate tenants to downtown Kansas City, including national coworking space WeWork.


Congratulations to our clients and the teams of architects, designers, engineers, craftsmen and contractors that helped make each of these projects a reality.

You can read about the full list of 2017 Capstone Award winners on the Kansas City Business Journal’s website


2 March, 2017 | Historic Renovation, Renovation

$65 million restoration of Historic Pickwick Plaza is nearing completion

History_Pickwick

One of Kansas City’s earliest and largest mixed-use developments, Pickwick Plaza has a rich history as a downtown destination and transportation hub. Although the structure was substantially underutilized throughout the late 20th-century, its restoration to its former glory is nearing completion.

The large mixed-use complex, located at 9-10th & McGee streets, originally housed the Pickwick Hotel, an office building, a parking garage and one of the largest bus terminals west of the Mississippi. Designed in 1929 by Wight & Wight, the building is one of many prominent civic buildings designed by the Kansas City firm – including City Hall, the Jackson County Courthouse and the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art.

History_Pickwick2

The mixed-use nature of the original building, including the hotel, office spaces, the bus terminal, retail — all within close proximity to the major governmental Kansas City buildings, anticipated a much greater future trend in mixed-use developments. The complex served business and government officials, locals and visitors, with many amenities all under one roof and a cohesive streetscape and exterior presence. In 1930, prominent radio stations KMBC and WHB relocated their operations into 11th floor penthouse addition atop the hotel building – broadcasting from that location until 1968.

The Pickwick Hotel was considered the place to stay when conducting business downtown or with government officials and was most notably known as a frequent retreat of Harry S. Truman during his early career with Jackson County government. His time in the hotel was largely spent writing what would later be known as the “Pickwick Papers” — a biographical mix of personal and political thoughts. The hotel remained operational throughout both World Wars and aided in Kansas City’s growth. During that period from the 30’s-50’s, the bus terminal saw nearly 5,000 bus departures per month.

Before_Shots_PickwickThe historic Pickwick Hotel lobby as it was in 1930, and the existing conditions at the beginning of our renovation & restoration process.

Many downtown buildings were torn down during the 1950-70’s, but luckily much of the exterior and primary interior spaces of Pickwick Plaza remained untouched. Following suburban flight and the national decline of downtown dwelling and public transportation in the 1960’s, the building was converted into subsidized housing in 1972. The 233 units were often under-occupied and eventually left empty until a fire took a toll on the building in 1996.

The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001 and ultimately purchased by Gold Crown Properties in 2013 with the intent of converting it into 260 market-rate apartments with amenities and rental rates that would attract young professionals.

Renderings_Pickwick

Helix partnered with Rosin Preservation to restore historic elements throughout the building. The lobby was restored to its original two-story height, allowing natural daylight to infiltrate the space. Large, historic windows maximize natural daylighting, reducing the need for artificial lighting in the units. To maintain consistency with the original character of the building and bring vibrancy to the surrounding area, Helix re-introduced street-side retail space, which has recently signed tenants such as UPS, a wine bar + restaurant and CityGym.

Construction on the redevelopment was completed in December on the north tower of East 9 at Pickwick Plaza apartments, which are currently available for lease. The new apartments feature a combination of traditional and unique amenities that are targeted towards downtown dwellers: a workout facility, a salt-water pool (located where the bus depot once was), garage parking, an office center, community room, on-grade retail, rooftop green space, high-efficiency appliances, washer/dryer hook-ups and walk-in closets. In line with the current “sharing economy” trend (think Uber and Airbnb), the City of Kansas City and developers have partnered with Zipcar — a national car-sharing company, allowing tenants to pay a monthly fee for usage of shared cars.

When it is completed this spring, the building will once again be an anchor development within the government district. We are proud to work alongside visionary developers like Gold Crown Properties to restore this historic landmark and continue to propel downtown Kansas City’s redevelopment.


9 February, 2017 | Culture, Helix People

Celebrating 25 years: A Love Letter to Kansas City

Helix 25h Anniversary PartyThank you, Kansas City.

Twenty-five years ago we were a bunch of young buck architects that optimistically saw opportunity where there were dilapidated buildings and empty parking lots. We took a risk, left our jobs and struck out on our own. We opened up shop at 9th + Baltimore, moved to 10th + Broadway and eventually landed at 16th + Walnut – where we are today. We hoped that there were others that shared our passion for revitalizing our city. At least enough to help keep our lights on.

You have delivered.

What you have become, what we have been able to be a part of over these last 25 years is inspiring.

When we talk about our city’s entrepreneurial story, this is it. It’s not all fast-growth tech startups (although they are terrific). It is small businesses coming together each day to support one another. It is the support of extraordinary clients and committed partners. And it is an ecosystem of programs (like HEMP) that nurture the passion to build something great and provide the framework for success.

Thanks to you we have been a part of something meaningful. Great work. Our life’s work. We have been able to restore some of the city’s greatest architectural treasures and add new life to the streetscapes we walk each day.

Your investment, your commitment makes our work possible. Because of you, we get to spend our days doing what we love. And at the end of the day, isn’t that what we all are striving for?

And while one can’t help but reflect when crossing any major milestone, our attention is focused on the next 25 years. Not only what is next for our firm, but also our industry and most importantly, for you – our city. How do we steer Kansas City’s growth in the right direction and create spaces that we will be proud of 25 years from now? How do we create places that will attract talent so that we can continue to grow as a city?

These are the questions that drive us and our work each day.

As we look towards the next 25 years, we remain committed to the principles and passion we were founded on – advancing our community through great design and civic engagement, maintaining exceptional quality in all that we do, supporting the arts, preserving our historic structures, and most of all placing the human experience at the center of everything we do.

We look around at the young talent that fills our office, the new energy they bring and fresh perspective on what this city can continue to become. They bring dreams and ideas beyond what we could have imagined 25 years ago. They challenge us. They inspire us. And we are proud to work side by side with them to design and dream and build our city for the next 25 years.

So thank you, Kansas City. We are proud to be part of your story and hope you are proud to be part of ours.

Fondly,
Helix


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