Monthly archives for March, 2017

23 March, 2017 | Awards, Recognition

Four Helix Clients Honored at Kansas City Business Journal’s Capstone Awards

Across Helix’s diverse portfolio of work there is a common thread – creating spaces that have a positive impact on our community. Four projects that exemplify this approach will be recognized this evening at the Kansas City Business Journal’s Capstone Awards ceremony.

The Capstone Awards celebrate projects that have demonstrated excellence in commercial real estate development over the past year. Whether it is an transforming a historic structure for a new life, providing a welcoming space that serves children or creating one of the city’s most celebrated hospitality venues, our clients continually receive accolades for investing in buildings that make our community a better place to work, learn and play.

We are honored to work alongside each of these organizations to bring their vision to life.


Boulevard Tours & Recreation Center

BOULEVARD BREWING CO.

Tours & Recreation Center – Adaptive Reuse Category

Boulevard Brewing Co. hosted approximately 60,000 tour guests in 2015. However, the limited size of their existing space meant they were turning away thousands of additional visitors. In response, Boulevard acquired the four-story, 87-year-old Skelly Oil building located immediately adjacent to the brewing campus and transformed it into their new Tours & Recreation Center. The first floor features an “Experience” area with exhibits about beer and Boulevard, an expanded retail shop and a larger tasting room. The 10,000-square-foot second floor is devoted to a Beer Hall and features a new 1,250-square-foot deck with outdoor seating and downtown Kansas City views.

 

Kansas City University Administration Building

KANSAS CITY UNIVERSITY OF MEDICINE & BIOSCIENCES

Administration Building Renovation – Adaptive Reuse Category

Originally home to the first Children’s Mercy Hospital, this 100-year-old building was acquired by KCU in the 1970s. Today, the newly renovated building functions as both the Administration Building and Welcome Center. A new open floorplan provides increased accessibility and amenities, including a Welcome Center, coffee bar and shared social/study spaces for the building’s 1,000+ users. The project achieved LEED Gold certification. This preservation and modernization of the building reflects KCU’s past, and celebrates a future of continued collaboration, research and service to the communities it serves.

 

Synergy Services Children's Center

SYNERGY SERVICES

Jennifer and Jamie Children’s Center – Community Impact Category

The new Jennifer and Jamie Children’s Center expands Synergy Services’ ability to provide shelter and services for children who’ve been abused, neglected or have other serious family problems. In addition to renovating the existing 2,500 sq. ft. home located on the property, Synergy invested in 6,500 sq. ft. of new construction on the site. The Center, which serves children from infancy to age 12, allows Synergy to double the number of children they are able serve. The project is designed to be a welcoming hopeful space, avoiding the institutional feel that most temporary foster facilities have.

 

Corrigan

3D DEVELOPMENT / COPAKEN BROOKS

Corrigan Station – Mixed-Use Category

Located prominently along the city’s new streetcar line, the 100-year-old Thomas Corrigan Building was renovated to create 9-stories of office space and 1-story of ground-level retail in the heart of the Crossroads Arts District. Helix worked closely with co-developers Copaken Brooks and 3D Development to develop a design that preserves the historic character of the building in accordance with National Park Service preservation guidelines. The building, which was largely unoccupied prior to renovation, has already attracted new corporate tenants to downtown Kansas City, including national coworking space WeWork.


Congratulations to our clients and the teams of architects, designers, engineers, craftsmen and contractors that helped make each of these projects a reality.

You can read about the full list of 2017 Capstone Award winners on the Kansas City Business Journal’s website


2 March, 2017 | Historic Renovation, Renovation

$65 million restoration of Historic Pickwick Plaza is nearing completion

History_Pickwick

One of Kansas City’s earliest and largest mixed-use developments, Pickwick Plaza has a rich history as a downtown destination and transportation hub. Although the structure was substantially underutilized throughout the late 20th-century, its restoration to its former glory is nearing completion.

The large mixed-use complex, located at 9-10th & McGee streets, originally housed the Pickwick Hotel, an office building, a parking garage and one of the largest bus terminals west of the Mississippi. Designed in 1929 by Wight & Wight, the building is one of many prominent civic buildings designed by the Kansas City firm – including City Hall, the Jackson County Courthouse and the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art.

History_Pickwick2

The mixed-use nature of the original building, including the hotel, office spaces, the bus terminal, retail — all within close proximity to the major governmental Kansas City buildings, anticipated a much greater future trend in mixed-use developments. The complex served business and government officials, locals and visitors, with many amenities all under one roof and a cohesive streetscape and exterior presence. In 1930, prominent radio stations KMBC and WHB relocated their operations into 11th floor penthouse addition atop the hotel building – broadcasting from that location until 1968.

The Pickwick Hotel was considered the place to stay when conducting business downtown or with government officials and was most notably known as a frequent retreat of Harry S. Truman during his early career with Jackson County government. His time in the hotel was largely spent writing what would later be known as the “Pickwick Papers” — a biographical mix of personal and political thoughts. The hotel remained operational throughout both World Wars and aided in Kansas City’s growth. During that period from the 30’s-50’s, the bus terminal saw nearly 5,000 bus departures per month.

Before_Shots_PickwickThe historic Pickwick Hotel lobby as it was in 1930, and the existing conditions at the beginning of our renovation & restoration process.

Many downtown buildings were torn down during the 1950-70’s, but luckily much of the exterior and primary interior spaces of Pickwick Plaza remained untouched. Following suburban flight and the national decline of downtown dwelling and public transportation in the 1960’s, the building was converted into subsidized housing in 1972. The 233 units were often under-occupied and eventually left empty until a fire took a toll on the building in 1996.

The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001 and ultimately purchased by Gold Crown Properties in 2013 with the intent of converting it into 260 market-rate apartments with amenities and rental rates that would attract young professionals.

Renderings_Pickwick

Helix partnered with Rosin Preservation to restore historic elements throughout the building. The lobby was restored to its original two-story height, allowing natural daylight to infiltrate the space. Large, historic windows maximize natural daylighting, reducing the need for artificial lighting in the units. To maintain consistency with the original character of the building and bring vibrancy to the surrounding area, Helix re-introduced street-side retail space, which has recently signed tenants such as UPS, a wine bar + restaurant and CityGym.

Construction on the redevelopment was completed in December on the north tower of East 9 at Pickwick Plaza apartments, which are currently available for lease. The new apartments feature a combination of traditional and unique amenities that are targeted towards downtown dwellers: a workout facility, a salt-water pool (located where the bus depot once was), garage parking, an office center, community room, on-grade retail, rooftop green space, high-efficiency appliances, washer/dryer hook-ups and walk-in closets. In line with the current “sharing economy” trend (think Uber and Airbnb), the City of Kansas City and developers have partnered with Zipcar — a national car-sharing company, allowing tenants to pay a monthly fee for usage of shared cars.

When it is completed this spring, the building will once again be an anchor development within the government district. We are proud to work alongside visionary developers like Gold Crown Properties to restore this historic landmark and continue to propel downtown Kansas City’s redevelopment.